Google+ Google+

Low Grade Geothermal Heating and Cooling for Greenhouses

39 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 3 Pin It Share 7 StumbleUpon 1 Reddit 12 Google+ 15 LinkedIn 1 Email -- Buffer 0 Filament.io 39 Flares ×

Low Grade Geothermal Heating and Cooling for Greenhouses

 

If you’ve watched our most recent video, we interview JD Sawyer from Colorado Aquaponics at the Grow Haus in Denver, Colorado.

 

We were down there interviewing JD about the work they were doing in the Denver community using aquaponics.  In any case, we asked JD about the geothermal (Earth Battery) that had been installed in the Grow Haus.

 

I’d seen it a year or two earlier when the building was still under construction, so I was curious about how it was performing for them.  I was also curious because we have a small Low Grade Geothermal (LGG) System installed in our greenhouse.

 

JD mentioned that it seemed to be working well for them, and when it had been running, I’d been impressed with the low-energy cooling capability of the system.

 

What is Low Grade Geothermal (LGG)?

For those of you who haven’t heard of LGG, it’s a method of using the thermal mass of the earth to both store energy (cooling; cycling hot air through to get cold air out), and dispense energy (heating; cycling cold air through to get cool air out).

 

Usually the way the system is set up is by excavating down below the floor of the greenhouse or in some instances the land adjacent (Citrus in the Snow) – {We do not vouch for the quality of the products listed on this site, nor advocate purchasing them!}

 

The most effective methods bury several feet of 4-6 inch corrugated septic tubing for every square foot of space being heated/cooled, with the intake and outflow pipes placed so that air flows though the space from the outflow to the intake.  Air is then circulated through the underground system.

 

During the summer, humid, hot air is circulated through the system, where the cool temperatures of the earth condense the moisture in the air, and the heat in the air is transferred to the soil around the tubes, emerging cooler and drier than it went in. In this way, the ground surrounding the system actually becomes a giant battery of sorts, storing energy transferred from the hot greenhouse.

 

In the winter, the air circulates through the system and comes out a constant 50-55 degrees all winter long, in some instances actually drawing off of the stored summer heat.

 

Obviously, the tubing system must be placed below the frost line at a depth where the soil temperature remains constant year round.  Here in Laramie, that’s about 6’ deep, but it varies from place to place.

 

Low Grade Geothermal Pioneers

There have been a couple of permaculture folks who have championed the technique, but in our area, there is a greenhouse grower that really promoted the technique, in fact, running the entire heating and cooling for the greenhouse complex and house off of a LGG system that he designed and implemented many years ago.

 

The farm is called Citrus in the Snow, and it is an excellent example of how LGG systems can be used to inexpensively heat and cool greenhouses with nothing more than a squirrel cage blower and buried tubing.

 

Benefits and Cost of Low Grade Geothermal

 

I find LGG systems very interesting because they represent a very simple and accessible technique for heating and cooling that anyone can implement on the front end of a build.

 

While the cost is somewhat high to put the system in- mainly for the necessary dirt work- the potential for long term, relatively free heating and cooling definitely outweighs the cost.

 

More Information

If you’re interested in finding out more about LGG systems, check out some the permaculture channels on YouTube, GrowHaus in Denver, and our YouTube video on our greenhouse setup.

 

If you’re interested in courses or learning how to grow commercially, check out Colorado Aquaponics- Tawnya and JD and their courses are a great opportunity for anyone to learn how to grow aquaponically from an expert.

 

For more information on Colorado Aquaponics and what the offer, check them out here: http://www.coloradoaquaponics.com

 

Author: Nate Storey

Dr. Nate Storey is the Co-Founder of Bright Agrotech, a high density, vertical farming equipment manufacturer.

Share This Post On

2 Comments

  1. In regards to the LGG used by Colorado Aquaponics. How deep did they bury the drain pipes to get the LGG advantage and many feet of tubing did they use per sqft of green house space? Also how warm does the green house stay? Worried about water temp getting to low for the fish. Between LGG and water drums I think I’ll be able to keep my future green house warm enough for aquaponics here in eastern Idaho. If you know I’d appreciate it. Thanks

    Post a Reply

Leave a Reply

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers

39 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 3 Pin It Share 7 StumbleUpon 1 Reddit 12 Google+ 15 LinkedIn 1 Email -- Buffer 0 Filament.io 39 Flares ×
%d bloggers like this:
Read more:
Aquaponics Stocking Density
Calcium in Aquaponics
Close